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2000 54 (ft.) Kanter 54

Inactive - This listing is not for sale at this time

General Information

Listing# 98598

Price
$900,000.00
Location
Havana, Cuba
Manufacturer
Kanter
Boat Type
Powerboat
Model Year
2000
Category
Pilothouse
Designer
Chuck Paine/Mark Fitzgerald
Model
54
Status
Used
Length
54 (ft.)
Beam
18.42
LOA
55.67
Hull Material
Steel
Fuel Type
Diesel
Engine Model
3306B
Number of Engines
1
Engine Type
Inboard

General Details

The Kanter 54 Passagemaker is an extremely reliable motor yacht with an unusually long range. She Is blessed with the highly popular forward raised pilothouse which sits snugly behind her beautiful and practical Portuguese bridge.

Like all Kanter yachts she is built of massively strong welded metal for the ultimate combination of leak proof integrity and brute strength.

 

She feature get home power with a 27 HP Westerbeke Wing Engine

Her tanks are an integral part of the hull adding to her strength. This effectively creates a double bottom for strength and safety.

Her hull is an efficient low-drag design that gives her a whopping 4500 mile range.

The stern was design to reduce the tendency to roll which is found in yachts of this type. The Marinabella sports stabilizers as well as a bowthruster.

Notes from her Master

We had to wait over a year and a half for the boat was ready. More than six trips to Canada to check every detail and compare notes with some dealers and many boating magazines. But steel is a noble material that protects the boat from bumps that affect a plastic helmet. The upper structure is made of aluminum for the weight difference helps the boat to return quickly to its floating position, if a wave comes to put it upside down, so it is dangerous to leave the bell lap.

After analyzing many boating magazines, go online for weeks and read every book published on the motor boats transatlantic capacity decided that there was no boat on the market that had the features I wanted:

 1) Strength . Once I had broken the two propellers and shafts, and barely saved the plastic helmet. The hull had to be made of steel, resistant to minor collisions.

2) Hardiness engine. As might withstand prolonged use, I decided on a military Caterpillar, stronger than the sports and business.

3) Communications. Not only for safety reasons but to keep up with the news, but especially in contact with my friends, the boat should be equipped with communication systems last level.

4) Size. He must be very large, so that it can fly by myself, but sufficiently large to cross the Atlantic. Some say that a boat may face waves up to 2 / 3 parts of its length. Words that could withstand waves of 40 feet. According to The Perfect Storm, a ship can only withstand waves of his sleeve. My sleeve is 19 feet, so that, putting myself in the most pessimistic estimate, I woul dhope to cruise in a maximum wave of 6 feet. But I will safe with anything mother nature has to offer.

We had to wait over a year and a half for the boat was ready. More than six trips to Canada to check every detail and compare notes with some dealers and many boating magazines. But steel is a noble material that protects the boat from bumps that affect a plastic helmet. The upper structure is made of aluminum for the weight difference helps the boat to return quickly to its floating position, if a wave comes to put it upside down, so it is dangerous to leave the bell lap.


After analyzing many boating magazines, go online for weeks and read every book published on the motor boats transatlantic capacity decided that there was no boat on the market that had the features I wanted:

1) Strength . Once I had broken the two propellers and shafts, and barely saved the plastic helmet. The hull had to be made of steel, resistant to minor collisions.

2) Hardiness engine. As might withstand prolonged use, I decided on a military Caterpillar, stronger than the sports and business.

3) Communications. Not only for safety reasons but to keep up with the news, but especially in contact with my friends, the boat should be equipped with communication systems last level.

4) Size. He must be very large, so that it can fly by myself, but sufficiently large to cross the Atlantic. Some say that a boat may face waves up to 2 / 3 parts of its length. Words that could withstand waves of 40 feet. According to The Perfect Storm, a ship can only withstand waves of his sleeve. My sleeve is 19 feet, so that, putting myself in the most pessimistic estimate, I hope not find waves over 6 feet, although there are none.

I also needed fuel filtration systems to prevent nozzle clogging in the case of water or dirt, water purifier equipment, vanes gyroscopic roll stabilizer to prevent the trawlers usual, GPS, plotter, autopilot and the inevitable grill roasts on board.

Mr. Manfred Kanter Kanter owner of the shipyard is a professional with extensive experience in yacht building, with a background from his work in Germany before emigrating to Canada. The Canadian shipyard workers are skilled and tend to check their work several times before to adopt them. They did Marinabella, named in honor of my daughter Marina.


This from the designers Chuck Paine and Mark Fitzgerald

 The Kanter 54 Passagemaker is intended as a highly reliable offshore voyaging yacht with unusually long range for a yacht of her type. Her configuration features the highly popular raised pilothouse forward behind a Portuguese bridge. Aft is the main salon with a good sized cockpit, and there are full side decks for passage fore and aft without entering the accommodations. The Paine design office has always prided itself on its aesthetic prowess, and we believe this to be one of the best looking of this type ever to be made available.

 Efficient performance is insured by the smooth, double chine hull form with a moderate prismatic coefficient of 0.625. A full length keel protects the propeller and rudder. Rock solid welded metal construction makes the occasional grounding or collision with flotsam an event of little importance.

 The stern shape has been dictated by the desirability of reducing the tendency to roll, making the yacht more comfortable to live aboard. This also increases fuel efficiency and range, as a hull which rolls less relies less upon fin or paravane type stabilizers, both of which create increased drag when the hull rolls easily.

 There are full headroom accommodations beneath the pilothouse extending forward into the bow. Being a semi custom design, the interior arrangements have been customized for each owner. The arrangement shown offers a spacious two staterooms and two heads, both with separate shower stalls. The voluminous owner's cabin has ensuite access to its totally private head, The engine room, located beneath the saloon, is extremely large and with nearly full standing headroom, permitting easy access to the machinery.

  The Marinabella fitted a Caterpillar 3306B 300 hp main engine and a Westerbeke 30B 27 horsepower wing engine. There is also a Northern Lights 20kw genset. The wing engine would be used to propel the yacht while service is performed on the main engine at sea, and as a “get home” engine should the main engine be out of service.

 Tankage will normally be for 3000 gallons of fuel and 500 gallons of fresh water. With this tankage the Marinabella completed transatlantic passages in both directions. These tanks are all integral, lending further structural strength to the hull and forming a double bottom wherever they occur. The day tank, waste and gray water tanks are of removable construction.

 The interior accommodations on this design are probably as voluminous and homelike as can possibly be achieved in so modest a length. The main salon has large windows on three walls for wonderful views of the surroundings. The pilothouse is far larger than one normally encounters, with a full length “watchstander’s bench”, convertible to a berth, and comfortable helm chairs for two persons.

 The deck and sheltered Portuguese bridge may be instantly accessed through doors both port and starboard.

 The Kanter 54 Passagemaker is built of massive strength welded metal for the ultimate in leak proof integrity and brute strength.

 The tanks are integral, of double bottom type, adding their strength to that of the vessel. Her efficient, low drag hullform and ample tankage makes ocean crossings feasible.

With a modest size genset, the yacht is easily heated, air conditioned, and supplied with all of the comforts of a shoreside home. She would make an ideal choice for one or two couples intending a retirement cruise to the Caribbean, or across to Europe and its fascinating canal system.

 

This Boat is Not for sale in US Waters

Specifications

Disclaimer
The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.
MARINABELLA
The Kanter 54 Passagemaker is an extremely reliable motor yacht with an unusually long range. She Is blessed with the highly popular forward raised pilothouse which sits snugly behind her beautiful and practical Portuguese bridge. Like all Kanter yachts she is built of massively strong welded metal for the ultimate combination of leak proof integrity and brute strength. Her tanks are an integral part of the hull adding to her strength. This effectively creates a double bottom for strength and safety. Her hull is an efficient low-drag design that gives her a whopping 4500 mile range. The stern was design to reduce the tendency to roll which is found in yachts of this type. Notes from her Master  We had to wait over a year and a half for the boat was ready. More than six trips to Canada to check every detail and compare notes with some dealers and many boating magazines. But steel is a noble material that protects the boat from bumps that affect a plastic helmet. The upper structure is made of aluminum for the weight difference helps the boat to return quickly to its floating position, if a wave comes to put it upside down, so it is dangerous to leave the bell lap. After analyzing many boating magazines, go online for weeks and read every book published on the motor boats transatlantic capacity decided that there was no boat on the market that had the features I wanted:   1) Strength . Once I had broken the two propellers and shafts, and barely saved the plastic helmet. The hull had to be made ??of steel, resistant to minor collisions.  2) Hardiness engine. As might withstand prolonged use, I decided on a military Caterpillar, stronger than the sports and business.  3) Communications. Not only for safety reasons but to keep up with the news, but especially in contact with my friends, the boat should be equipped with communication systems last level. 4 ) Size. He must be very large, so that it can fly by myself, but sufficiently large to cross the Atlantic. Some say that a boat may face waves up to 2 / 3 parts of its length. Words that could withstand waves of 40 feet. According to The Perfect Storm, a ship can only withstand waves of his sleeve. My sleeve is 19 feet, so that, putting myself in the most pessimistic estimate, I woul dhope to cruise in a maximum wave of 6 feet. But I will safe with anything mother nature has to offer. We had to wait over a year and a half for the boat was ready. More than six trips to Canada to check every detail and compare notes with some dealers and many boating magazines. But steel is a noble material that protects the boat from bumps that affect a plastic helmet. The upper structure is made of aluminum for the weight difference helps the boat to return quickly to its floating position, if a wave comes to put it upside down, so it is dangerous to leave the bell lap.   After analyzing many boating magazines, go online for weeks and read every book published on the motor boats transatlantic capacity decided that there was no boat on the market that had the features I wanted: 1) Strength . Once I had broken the two propellers and shafts, and barely saved the plastic helmet. The hull had to be made ??of steel, resistant to minor collisions. 2) Hardiness engine. As might withstand prolonged use, I decided on a military Caterpillar, stronger than the sports and business. 3) Communications. Not only for safety reasons but to keep up with the news, but especially in contact with my friends, the boat should be equipped with communication systems last level. 4) Size. He must be very large, so that it can fly by myself, but sufficiently large to cross the Atlantic. Some say that a boat may face waves up to 2 / 3 parts of its length. Words that could withstand waves of 40 feet. According to The Perfect Storm, a ship can only withstand waves of his sleeve. My sleeve is 19 feet, so that, putting myself in the most pessimistic estimate, I hope not find waves over 6 feet, although there are none. I also needed fuel filtration systems to prevent nozzle clogging in the case of water or dirt, water purifier equipment, vanes gyroscopic roll stabilizer to prevent the trawlers usual, GPS, plotter, autopilot and the inevitable grill roasts on board. Mr. Manfred Kanter Kanter owner of the shipyard is a professional with extensive experience in yacht building, with a background from his work in Germany before emigrating to Canada. The Canadian shipyard workers are skilled and tend to check their work several times before to adopt them. They did Marinabella, named in honor of my daughter Marina.