Hatteras 40 Double Cabin survey report

We spoke to Reno Panico of Atlantic Seaboard Marine Surveyors in Chester, Maryland, and St. Petersburg, Florida, about the Hatteras 40 Double Cabin. Here’s what he had to say about this model and the challenges of surveying any boat.

• “The Hatteras 40 Double Cabin was a fine boat. Most of them came with Caterpillar 3208s, some of them came with gasoline power. It was not a great boat with gasoline power, something like 40 gallons per hour. I’ve seen a few with Detroit Diesel 6-71s, it’s not a bad boat.”

• “Another common problem area on a lot of boats is the area around the windlass, which you want to pay attention to. The problem is when the boat is on the anchor, there’s not always a cleat to take the strain off the windlass. Some of those boats that do have a cleat have a chain rode, so the pressure [of the anchor] is taken by the windlass and actually the 5200, the sealing agent, will come apart and water will find its way between the deck and the windlass surface. It’s something to look at on many boats. If the moisture gets to the point where it delaminated the structure, that would be reflected in the survey report.”

• “On any vessel: stringers, bulkheads. A good surveyor will already know that some areas on some vessels, if a companionway leaks into the saloon, eventually water will find its way into the aft bulkhead in the engine room. The ability to check the bulkhead may not be 100 percent because you’ve got battery chargers, the fuel system, there’s plenty of stuff in the way. But a good surveyor will go in there with an icepick and see if there is any softness in the glass or the wood because they were often made of wood encapsulated in fiberglass, and the same thing with the forward bulkhead. You may want to spend a little extra time because it’s a common area, but not necessarily on that particular model.”

Atlantic Seaboard Marine Surveyors, 410-604-0432; www.atlanticseaboardmarine.com

Click here for a look at the Hatteras 40 Double Cabin.