A Good Running Game

THE CRUISERS 41 CANTIUS EXEMPLIFIES TRADITIONAL AMERICAN VALUES AND SHE’S A PLEASURE TO RUN

41C_0438_med_fmtThe first thing I noticed about the Cruisers 41 Cantius I tested on Green Bay was her strikingly sleek profile. However, that low-slung roof is not simply an aesthetic choice. While it certainly cuts a clean line, the profile has a certain duality of purpose that is key to the boat’s design. In this case the low roof is easier to wash down after a cruise. Of course there’s also her high-end, high-tech Imedge gelcoat, a standard feature on all Cruisers.

Performance:

But I’m getting ahead of myself. The reason you’ll buy this boat is not because of her profile, however lovely, or the ease with which she cleans up. It’s the way she runs. I really wasn’t expecting the Cantius to titillate me quite the way she did out on the water. She ran plenty fast, sure. Her twin 370-horsepower Volvo Penta D6 diesels boosted her to just north of 35 knots on the pins, which was certainly enough to blow back the hair on my head. But more remarkable was her exceptional responsiveness. An odd word to describe a boat popped into my head as I was running her through S-turns and hardovers: eager. The Volvo controls and steering were effortlessly smooth as the boat shot this way and that across the glass-calm lake with a pleasing serenity, even at top speed. Even more remarkable was the about-face she did at 30 knots. When I put her hardover, she completed the half-pirouette in less than two boat lengths. In truth, she felt more like a runabout than a boat with a 42-foot 8-inch LOA.

Construction:

Cruisers creates its hulls from hand-laid fiberglass, using cored construction in all hull and deck components. A fiberglass liner is permanently bonded to the stringers and sheer shelf with mechanical fasteners and methylmethacrylate adhesive.

The Cantius’ onboard highlights are myriad. Chief among them is the convertible swim platform. That’s right, convertible. The chunky piece of teak and fiberglass serves not only as an ample headquarters for swim-related activities, but also easily morphs into a miniature al fresco bar via two stools that stow in the transom and secure firmly into the platform. I have to say, it’s a pretty creative way to amplify the usable entertaining space onboard.

Accommodations:

On the accommodations deck, that slicked-back windshield manages to bathe the down-galley in sunlight. The forepeak master is notable for its volume. It’s got plenty of headroom—to the tune of almost 7 feet at the foot of the queen-size berth. There’s a spacious en suite guest cabin aft, which like the swim platform and sleek profile, serves double duty. Removable panels in the bulkheads surrounding the twin berths cover all of the boat’s electrical systems, as well as two air conditioning units, and more, effectively turning the cabin into a de facto control room. It’s an design detail that saves literal boatloads of space onboard, and one which is indicative of the 41: a creatively laid-out cruiser that ran well enough to make Green Bay memorable to me for more than just football and cheese.

42’8"
13’0"
3’9"
24,000 lb.
300 gal.
75 gal.
$713,950

Blue hull paint, 120-volt central vacuum system, 2/22-inch Sony LCD TVs/DVD players, Algae-X fuel-conditioning system, stainless steel anchor, anchor and cockpit washdowns, Force 10 electric grill in cockpit 120-volt fridge/ice maker, teak decking, underwater lights.

Air temperature: 71ºF; humidity 59%; seas: 0’; load: 300 gal. fuel, 75 gal. water, 2 persons, 50 lb. gear. Speeds are two-way averages measured w/ Volvo Penta onboard GPS display. GPH taken via Volvo Penta display. Range is 90% of advertised fuel capacity. Sound measured at the helm. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.