Better Than One

The Journey 47 LR Cat sets a new standard for long-range power-cruising designs.

To the list of attributes usually associated with cruising power catamarans—excellent fuel economy and range, spacious living areas, outstanding stability underway—you can now add the phrase “classic lines and top-drawer interior,” particularly when describing the new Journey 47 Long Range Catamaran.

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Accommodations:

The Journey 47 LRC features twin wave-piercing hulls that penetrate oncoming waves rather than riding up on them, creating a flatter running angle underway and less pitching fore and aft, for a smoother ride that reduces wave-making resistance. Tim Kernan has drawn the boat with a massive flying bridge that includes three helm seats, lockers and a large settee with table, a spiral staircase with good handholds, and wide side decks. The flying bridge overhang provides good protection for the aft deck, and the dinghy is stored on a rack aft.

Views from the saloon are extraordinary, a benefit for crew, guests, and the helmsman at the lower station forward. There’s a well-equipped galley to port, and a dinette to starboard. A hand-laid teak and holly sole is standard, and the fit and finish are nothing short of magnificent, with joinery from the craftsmen of Jet-Tern Marine (builder of Selene) where the 47 LRC was built.

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In the standard two stateroom layout, the starboard hull houses the master forward, with a queen size berth atop a built-in chest of drawers and multiple hanging lockers. Going forward, there’s a nice-sized head with Tecma freshwater toilets, a separate shower compartment, and a door leading to a stowage compartment that allows access to the front of the engine just behind a watertight door. The guest stateroom layout to port is very similar, with a slightly smaller berth, but doesn’t skimp on stowage, including another large compartment abaft the head and separate shower. There is an optional three-stateroom layout available.

Construction:

All major components of the hull and deck structures are built using a resin infusion process. Initial layers are vinylester resin for optimal resistance to water osmosis, followed by alternating layers of bi-axial, uni-direction stitched roving/mat and Taiwan Glass mat. Above the waterline, CoreCell is used in the hull, as well as in the superstructure, to create a lightweight, stiff structure, which is reinforced by longitudinal stringers and multiple transverse frames. The hull-to-deck joint is sealed with adhesive, stainless steel bolts, and an inner lamination of fiberglass.

Performance:

Underway, the twin 220-horsepower Cummins QSD diesels turning 20 x 20 x 4 props through SeaTorque drive shafts produced a smooth and quiet ride at the lower helm. New 21 x 19 x 5 Michigan Wheel M500 series props are planned for hull number one, adding about 30 percent more surface area and an anticipated increase in economy and top end speed. Beginning with hull number two, standard 260-horsepowerYanmar 6BY diesels spinning 23-inch diameter props will be standard propulsion, adding 40 more horsepower and reducing weight by 100 pounds per engine.

True to concept, the test ride across San Francisco Bay was exceptionally stable in all three axes. The wave-piercing bows made quick work of the short chop we experienced, and the tracking was superb. Hard over turns were flat and comfortable, even from the flying bridge, where the engine noise was minimal.

47’5"
18’0"
3’6" (half load)
37,500 lb.
680 gal.
145 gal
2/220-hp Cummins QSD diesels
2/260-hp Yanmar diesels
$889,000

Splendide combo washer/dryer with vented system, Raritan ice maker in cockpit, handheld remote engine control on cable w/ cockpit and foredeck stations; custom 3.3-meter Hypalon dinghy, F/G bottom and anchor locker w/ transom rack; 32-inch LED TV in saloon on pop-up/swivel mount.

flat. Load 240 gal. fuel, 50 gal. water. Sound levels measured with the aft sliding door and windows closed and the generator not running. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.