Everything Green is Gold

If you’re looking for a stylish, long-range cruiser with serious environmental
credentials, look no further than the Magellano 50.

The Azimut Magellano 50, which launched in late 2010, is the second build in the Magellano line following 2009’s much-lauded 74-foot model. Many of her features were added specifically to make her as unobtrusive to the natural environment as possible. For example, any teak onboard is “new” teak, which means that it is harvested from trees registered with the Forest Stewardship Council. Also, the new teak is made from glued strips of wood, which not only makes it stronger than traditional teak, but allows craftsmen to use up to 90 percent of the tree, whereas traditional teak usually uses only about 20 percent.

ekMagellano 50 Running_fmt

Construction:

The 50, like all Magellanos (there are plans for several more models) has an innovative dual-mode hull which greatly decreases the amount of horsepower she requires to run efficiently and quickly. The builder refers to the hull as dual-mode because the Magellano actually has two optimal cruise speeds. She functions ably as a full-displacement vessel at 6 to 7 knots but can also cruise in semi-displacement mode at around 16 knots. This is no magic trick. Hull designer Bill Dixon designed the Magellano’s bottom with a soft, rounded midsection that helps her smoothly transition from slow speeds to higher ones.

Performance:

The boat is pushed along by high-efficiency propellers that are turned by twin, low-emission, 425-hp Cummins QSB 5.9s. That horsepower may sound low to you for a boat of this size, but it is by design.

The result is a boat that is as comfortable at trawler-like paces as she is getting up on plane and scooting around the ocean blue. When I tested her off of Savona, Italy, not only did I take her hardover in three boat lengths at 16 knots, but on the pins I got her up to 18.3 on an admittedly dirty bottom. If clean, I wouldn’t be surprised if she eked out another knot or two. What’s more, at either of her two cruise speeds, she positively sips her fuel. At six knots, she burns only 2.3 gallons per hour, and at 18 knots, she uses only about 40.

Accommodations:

The 50’s saloon comprises the main indoor entertainment area. It features excellent natural light and views since it’s almost completely surrounded by large windows, a feature which guests will surely appreciate. An aft galley makes al fresco dining de rigeur. And if the big game happens to coincide with a gorgeous day out on the water, have no fear, a 32-inch TV in the after part of the saloon cranes out on a pivot so it is viewable from the cockpit. Problem solved.

ekMagellano 50_Salon_2_fmt

Topside, the flying bridge is ready to party with a dining settee to port, a barbecue, and a sink. However the coolest feature on this deck is indubitably an outdoor shower hidden in the radar arch. If you’d like a bit more privacy, just move the party forward to the bow, where there’s another entertainment area featuring two bench seats. This feature, which is somewhat of a rarity on 50-footers, is particularly useful anywhere boats dock stern-to, so that passengers can glean some respite from prying, onshore eyes. However, it is still an ideal place to chill out no matter where you decide to cruise. And with this boat’s leggy, near-2,000-mile range at displacement speeds, those destinations will be myriad.

51’4
14’6
4’4
42,549 lb.
800 gal.
185 gal.
2/425-hp Cummins QSB 5.9 diesels
$1,450,000
15-kW Onan
2/23-kW Auxilia electric motors
ZF 85 IV 2.49:1
4-blade NiBrAl 736mm diameter

2- or 3-stateroom layout; Teak cockpit/sidedecks/bathing platform ($40,000); Seakeeper stabilizer ($126,000); Hydraulic tender lift ($35,000)

Air temperature: 61ºF; humidity 30%; seas: flat; load: 650 gal. fuel, 165 gal. water, 6 persons, 220 lb. gear. Speeds are two-way averages measured w/ Raymarine display. GPH taken via Raymarine display. Range is 90% of advertised fuel capacity. Sound levels measured at the helm. 65 d(B)A is the level of normal conversation.