The Wizard of Oz

Bill Barry-Cotter is the founder of Maritimo and a serial boatbuilder. He has no doubt laid claim to many victories in his day, and now the Maritimo M58 can join that long list of wins. design: Barry-Cotter’s original key design principles are at the core of the new M58: Simplicity, efficiency, cruisability, and a seakindly [...]

Bill Barry-Cotter is the founder of Maritimo and a serial boatbuilder. He has no doubt laid claim to many victories in his day, and now the Maritimo M58 can join that long list of wins.

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design:

Barry-Cotter’s original key design principles are at the core of the new M58: Simplicity, efficiency, cruisability, and a seakindly hull. The waterline length is approximately three and a half feet longer than the 56—the model that the 58 replaces—and according to Barry-Cotter, she has improved weight distribution relative to her smaller sister, adding to her efficiency.

Based on customer feedback, a full-beam master was a must, although he wanted to keep the beam less than 18 feet in order to maintain efficiency. This was nonnegotiable. It meant changing the fuel-tank configuration from a one-tank design that spanned the centerline on the 56, to twin integral tanks running along the outboard hullsides. Barry-Cotter ensured they were placed in line with the center of buoyancy, adding another element to ensure a good ride.

Accommodations:

This engineering effort allowed for a king berth in the master stateroom, placed at an angle to maximize space. Three steps separate the lower level from an upper-level foyer and vanity area. “After talking to some Americans, we realized we needed to make this an apartment,” said Barry-Cotter referring to the M58’s volume.

A double guest stateroom with en suite is tucked into the bow and a single stateroom lines the starboard passageway. Cruising details are incorporated throughout the M58. For example, large overhead hatches and opening ports are in each stateroom and head. There’s no need to have the 17-kW genset running all the time. Drop the hook and let the breezes flow.

The 58 has a richly finished interior, enhanced by details such as leather and stainless handrails, more fabric coverings, less exposed fiberglass, and updated hardware and joinery details. Stewart embraced that thin line between fresh and sophisticated and over-the-top trendy. Five, ten, 20 years from now, the 58’s teak interior will still retain its timeless elegance.

Performance:

The M58 has a very respectable range. At 21 knots you can expect 618 miles, with a ten-percent reserve. Pull the throttles back to 1400 rpm and the range climbs to 576 miles at 12.5 knots.

During our sea trial of the M58 we hit 31.3 knots for an average top end in a sheltered waterway and then headed out into the Coral Sea to put the boat to the real test. Seas were four to five feet and remained confused from a passing front. Nevertheless, once I got going I didn’t want to turn around. The 58 found a groove that was habit-forming. She rose over each wave like a battleship, and settled into the ensuing trough with triumphant glee, pluming spray well beyond her forward quarter. The variable-deadrise hull took everything I threw at her with ease.

61’4"
17’1"
4’5"
63,934 lb.
1,321 gal.
211 gal.
2/800-hp Volvo Penta D13 diesels
$2,050,000
17.5-kW

Air temperature: 82°F; humidity: 85%; seas: calm; load: 1,000 gal. fuel, 200 gal. water, 9 persons. Speeds measured with Simrad GPS. GPH estimates taken via Volvo display. Range is 90% of advertised fuel capacity. Sound levels taken at the lower helm. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.