Mistakes to Avoid at the Boat Show, Part 1

ybs0215Brokers working for boat buyers take on many clients, especially around boat-show time. This is their time to step it up, and the research they do and the boats they preview for one client can have the happy coincidence of also aiding other clients in finding a new boat.

Should boat buyers follow that lead and spread their search among multiple brokers? That’s not a good idea, says Brian Nopper, a yacht broker with HMY Yacht Sales in Dania Beach, Florida. “Just talking to too many people, they can get confused, they can’t remember who they spoke with and they get different stories,” he says. “Sometimes they get themselves in a pickle, because they may not have told you that you’re going to see a boat that they’ve already called on.” That’s not a good use of anyone’s time.

nopperBoaters are better informed today before they even call a broker. “By the time the customer has called me, he or she knows more about the boats [listed on the Internet] that they think they want to see,” Nopper says. “They’re calling on a 38 Tiara or a 48 Viking, they know every one that’s in the market, they know every one and what their prices are, they knows how long they’ve been on the market, how many hours, they know his market segment cold.”

But brokers do more than search listings. “You need to be cognizant of what you’re doing with your deposit, and your closing—a good broker and a good brokerage house are protecting your money by way of conveying title [of the boat],” Nopper continues. “That’s paramount.”

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